Friday, 30 March 2012

Your Teeth and Dental Bonding


Dental bonding is a procedure in which a tooth-colored resin material (a durable plastic material) is applied and hardened with a special light, which ultimately "bonds" the material to the tooth to restore or improve person's smile.

For What Conditions Is Dental Bonding Considered?

Dental bonding is an option that can be considered:

·      To repair decayed teeth (composite resins are used to fill cavities)
·      To repair chipped or cracked teeth
·      To improve the appearance of discolored teeth
·      To close spaces between teeth
·      To make teeth look longer
·      To change the shape of teeth
·      As a cosmetic alternative to amalgam fillings
·      To protect a portion of the tooth's root that has been exposed when gums recede

What's the Procedure for Having a Tooth Bonded?

·      Preparation. Little advance preparation is needed for dental bonding. Anesthesia is often not necessary unless the bonding is being used to fill a decayed tooth. Your dentist will use a shade guide to select a composite resin color that will closely match the color of your tooth.
·      The bonding process. Next, the surface of the tooth will be roughened and a conditioning liquid applied. These procedures help the bonding material adhere to the tooth. The tooth-colored, putty-like resin is then applied, molded, and smoothed to the desired shape. An ultraviolet light or laser is then used to harden the material. After the material is hardened, your dentist will further trim and shape it, and polish it to match the sheen of the rest of the tooth surface.
·      Time-to-completion. Dental bonding takes about 30 to 60 minutes per tooth to complete.

What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Dental Bonding?

·      Advantages: Dental bonding is among the easiest and least expensive of cosmetic dental procedures. Unlike veneers and crowns, which are customized tooth coverings that must be manufactured in a laboratory, bonding usually can be done in one office visit unless several teeth are involved. Another advantage, compared with veneers and crowns, is that the least amount of tooth enamel is removed. Also, unless dental bonding is being performed to fill a cavity, anesthesia is usually not required.
·      Disadvantages: Although the material used in dental bonding is somewhat stain resistant, it does not resist stains as well as crowns. Another disadvantage is that the bonding materials do not last as long nor are as strong as other restorative procedures, such as crowns, veneers, or fillings. Additionally, bonding materials can chip and break off the tooth.

Because of some of the limitations of dental bonding, some dentists view it as best suited for small cosmetic changes, for temporary correction of cosmetic defects, and for correction of teeth in areas of very low bite pressure (for example, front teeth). Consult with your dentist about the best cosmetic approach for your particular problem.

Above article from: WebMD.com

Dentist Hickory Hills IL
Tisoncik Anthony J DDS
Tel: 708-599-2929
8071 West 95th Street
Hickory Hills, IL 60457   US

Wednesday, 28 March 2012

Dental Health With Crooked Teeth and Misaligned Bites


There are several reasons why some people's teeth grow in crooked, overlapping, or twisted. Some people's mouths are too small for their teeth, which crowds the teeth and causes them to shift. In other cases, a person's upper and lower jaws aren't the same size or are malformed, resulting in either an overbite, when there is excessive protrusion of the upper jaw, or an under bite, when the lower jaw protrudes forward causing the lower jaw and teeth to extend out beyond the upper teeth.

Most often crooked teeth, overbites, and under bites are inherited traits just as the color of your eyes or size of your hands. Other causes of misaligned bites are early loss of baby or adult teeth; improper fit of dental restorations (for example, fillings or crowns); gingivitis (gum disease); undue pressure on the teeth and gums; misalignment of jaw after severe facial injury; tumors of the mouth or jaw; or common oral health problems in children such as thumb sucking, tongue thrusting, pacifier use beyond the age of three, or prolonged use of a bottle.

What Problems Come With Crooked Teeth and Misaligned Bites?

Crooked teeth and misaligned bites can:

·      Interfere with proper chewing.
·      Make keeping teeth clean more of a challenge, increasing the risk of tooth decay, cavities, and gingivitis.
·      Strain the teeth, jaws, and muscles, increasing the risk of breaking a tooth.
·      Make people feel self-conscious about their appearance and affect their self-esteem.

How Do I Know if My Teeth Are Crooked or My Bite Is Misaligned?

While you can see for yourself if your teeth are crooked, your dentist can determine if your problem warrants treatment. Your dentist will look for the following signs:

·      Abnormal alignment of your teeth
·      Abnormal appearance of your face
·      Difficulty or discomfort when chewing or biting
·      Speech difficulties, including a lisp

Your dentist will usually refer you to an orthodontist --a dentist who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of crooked teeth and misaligned jaws.

What Tests Can I Expect at the Orthodontist?

The orthodontist will likely take X-rays, photographs of your face, and teeth impressions to determine if and what type of treatment is needed. X-rays provide information on the position of your teeth and roots and if any teeth have yet to come through the gums. Special cephalometrics or panoramic X-rays show the relationship of the teeth to the jaws and the jaws to the head. Your orthodontist may also want to take regular photographs of your face to further examine the relationship between your teeth, jaws, and head. Finally, impressions may be made of your teeth. This is done by having you bite down on a soft material that is later used to create an exact copy of your teeth.

How Are Crooked Teeth and Misaligned Bites Treated?

Once a diagnosis is made, your orthodontist can decide the best treatment for your teeth or misaligned bite. For some people, a removable retainer (to stabilize the new position of teeth) will be all that's needed to correct the problem. Removal of one or more teeth may be required if overcrowding is the main problem. For most people, braces are necessary to correct the problem. In rare and extreme cases, such as an extreme overbite or under bite, an operation may be necessary.

Above article from: WebMD.com

Dentist Hickory Hills IL
Tisoncik Anthony J DDS
Tel: 708-599-2929
8071 West 95th Street
Hickory Hills, IL 60457   US

Monday, 26 March 2012