Monday, 30 April 2012

Dental Crowns


A dental crown is a tooth-shaped "cap" that is placed over a tooth - covering the tooth to restore its shape and size, strength, and/or to improve its appearance.
The crowns, when cemented into place, fully encase the entire visible portion of a tooth that lies at and above the gum line.

Why Is a Dental Crown Needed?
A dental crown may be needed in the following situations:
To protect a weak tooth (for instance, from decay) from breaking or to hold together parts of a cracked tooth
To restore an already broken tooth or a tooth that has been severely worn down
To cover and support a tooth with a large filling when there isn't a lot of tooth left
To hold a dental bridge in place
To cover misshapened or severely discolored teeth
To cover a dental implant

What Types of Crowns Are Available?
Permanent crowns can be made from all metal, porcelain-fused-to-metal, all resin, or all ceramic.

Metals used in crowns include gold alloy, other alloys (for example, palladium) or a base-metal alloy (for example, nickel or chromium). Compared with other crown types, less tooth structure needs to be removed with metal crowns, and tooth wear to opposing teeth is kept to a minimum. Metal crowns withstand biting and chewing forces well and probably last the longest in terms of wear down. Also, metal crowns rarely chip or break. The metallic color is the main drawback. Metal crowns are a good choice for out-of-sight molars.

Porcelain-fused-to-metal dental crowns can be color matched to your adjacent teeth (unlike the metallic crowns). However, more wearing to the opposing teeth occurs with this crown type compared with metal or resin crowns. The crown's porcelain portion can also chip or break off. Next to all-ceramic crowns, porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns look most like normal teeth. However, sometimes the metal underlying the crown's porcelain can show through as a dark line, especially at the gum line and even more so if your gums recede. These crowns can be a good choice for front or back teeth.

All-resin dental crowns are less expensive than other crown types. However, they wear down over time and are more prone to fractures than porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns.

All-ceramic or all-porcelain dental crowns provide the best natural color match than any other crown type and may be more suitable for people with metalallergies. However, they are not as strong as porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns and they wear down opposing teeth a little more than metal or resin crowns. All-ceramic crowns are a good choice for front teeth.

Temporary versus permanent. Temporary crowns can be made in your dentist's office whereas permanent crowns are made in a dental laboratory. Temporary crowns are made of acrylic or stainless steel and can be used as a temporary restoration until a permanent crown is constructed by the dental laboratory.

Above article from: Webmd.com

Dentist Hickory Hills IL
Tisoncik Anthony J DDS
Tel: 708-599-2929
8071 West 95th Street
Hickory Hills, IL 60457   US

Thursday, 12 April 2012

Wednesday, 11 April 2012

Oral Cancer Screening - Preventive Dental Care Palos Hills IL



Preventive Dentistry Hickory Hills IL

Tisoncik Anthony J DDS
Tel: 708-599-2929
8071 West 95th Street
Hickory Hills, IL 60457
USA

Sunday, 8 April 2012

Palos Hills Dentist - Dental Office - Cosmetic Family Implant Restorativ...



Our new office is getting closer to completion! Watch the video clip below to see the great progress! We are on target for opening our new Palos Hills Dental Office at the beginning of May.


Dentist Hickory Hills
Tisoncik Anthony J DDS
Tel: 708-599-2929
8071 West 95th Street
Hickory Hills, IL 60457
USA
http://paloshillsdental.com

Sunday, 1 April 2012

Keep Your Breath Fresh Step by Step


1.     We’ve all done a hand check, right? But other than a false sense of security -- or maybe a hand that smells -- what does it prove? Not much. But what we do know is you are what you eat. When you eat, food starts to be digested in your mouth. Bacteria break down food particles and releases sulfur compounds that are involved in bad breath.

2.     Another cause is poor oral health. Bacteria from tooth decay or gum problems will linger in your mouth like a vacationing guest at your house, so ask yourself: Are you really brushing and flossing as you should? Are you using an antibacterial mouthwash? A more severe problem, like gingivitis or periodontal disease, will require professional intervention. So visit your dentist regularly as part of your battle against halitosis.

3.     Speaking of bacteria, your tongue can be a magnet for unpleasant germs and smells, so don’t forget it when you’re brushing. If your tongue feels like it needs to be shaved with a razor, brushing may not be enough. If that’s the case, use a tongue-cleaning device to scrape it clean. You might even get one free when you see your dentist.

4.     It may seem obvious, but eau du tobacco … no. If you want fresh breath, don’t smoke.

5.     How wet is your whistle? Saliva is the body’s natural way of keeping your mouth cleansed, and the salivary gland doesn’t work as well if your well is dry.

6.     Finally, persistent bad breath could be the sign of a major medical problem, like acid reflux, sinus infections, diabetes, or kidney problems. So make sure you get regular medical checkups and follow any special instructions your doctor may give you.


Above article from: WebMD.com


Dentist Hickory Hills IL
Tisoncik Anthony J DDS
Tel: 708-599-2929
8071 West 95th Street
Hickory Hills, IL 60457   US